Beets – סלקא

In Hebrew, the word for Beet is סלקא, is closely related to סלק —meaning to depart. So taking that in mind, we eat beets symbolically and say the following:

יְהִי רָצוֹן מִלְּפָנֶיךָ ה’ אֱלֹהינוּ וֵאלֵֹהי אֲבוֹתֵינוּ, שֶׁיִּסְתַּלְּקוּ אוֹיְבֵינוּ וְשׂוֹנְאֵינוּ וְכָל מְבַקְשֵׁי רָעָתֵנוּ

May it be Your will, Lord our G-d and the G-d of our fathers, that our enemies, haters and those who wish evil upon us shall depart.

So with that wishful adieu, I give you two beet recipes to say “later haters!”

 

Beet & Rice Salad

Beet and Rice Salad

This recipe comes from a good friend, Esther Prisman. I find it easier if purchase the pre-cooked, already peeled beets now available on the market, and then using the food processor with the shredding blade to grate them.

Ingredients:

2 cups cooked rice, cooled
2 cups cooked beets, cooled and grated (around 3-4 whole beets)
3 tablespoons green onions, chopped

Dressing:

2 tablespoons vinegar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon salt
⅓ cup mayonnaise
Pepper to taste

Instructions:

Combine all dressing ingredients in a bowl, and mix thoroughly. Pour dressing over the rest of the ingredients and mix well. Cover and refrigerate, allowing to marinate. Serve at room temperature.

 

Roasted Beets

Tasty Roasted Beets

Quick tip, beet juice really stains, which is what makes it an excellent natural food colouring! However, if you don’t want your cutting board or fingers to turn bright pink, I suggest wearing gloves when chopping these raw beets and taping down a piece of wax paper over your cutting board. Just make sure you secure the paper well so that it doesn’t slip while you are cutting.

Ingredients:

4 beets, peeled and cut into ¾ -inch cubes
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves (optional)
1 pinch sea salt, or to taste

Directions:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Toss the beets, olive oil, and thyme in a bowl until beets are coated, and arrange pieces of beet on baking sheet so that they don’t touch. Sprinkle the beets with sea salt. Roast in the preheated oven until the beets are tender, 10 to 20 minutes. A fork inserted into a beet cube should come out easily.

Advertisements

New Year’s Countdown – 6 Days To Go!

Around the World

This New Year, I will be celebrating away from my home and family for only the second time in my life. It only becomes stranger when I realize that the way I do something, the way my family does it, isn’t necessarily the way everyone else does it. You think this would have dawned on me before it was less than a week until the Holidays! That started me thinking about Jewish New Year traditions all over the world. Between the two main branches of Ashkanazi (most North American Jews and those of European descent) and Sephardi (those Jews descending from the Middle East and Africa), there are vast differences. Even within these two groups though you have so many individual traditions, just related to the food portion alone! Some people don’t eat anything sour, such a pickles or lemons, so that they won’t have a sour year. Some stay away from spicy foods, others from foods that make you drowsy, so that you don’t sleep through the New Year. The important part to remember is that while we are all different, at the core, we are all the same, and we all need to eat! This year, try thinking outside the box and making that Sephardi brisket you read about? Or some Ashkanazi salt & pepper gefilte fish.. who knows, you just might like it!