Pan-Fried Whiting Fillets with Garlic Kale

Pan-Fried Whiting Fillets with Garlic KaleOkay, so Queen Victoria’s chef may not have made his whiting fillets like I have in the recipe below, but to be honest, it was probably pretty close. I found another recipe from the era and it gives a simple recipe for dusting the fillets and serving them with a Hollandaise sauce. I figure a beurre blanc sauce with garlic kale is a nice modern twist. This recipe will serve 6-8 people. I hope you enjoy it!

Fillets of Whitings FriedIngredients:

Garlic Kale:
2 large bunches (about 500g) kale, stems trimmed*
½ cup unsalted butter (1 stick)
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
½ teaspoon chili flakes

Whiting Fillets:
⅔ cup olive oil
½ cup flour
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon white pepper
16 (about 1.1 kg) whiting fillets, skin off

Beurre Blanc:
½ cup dry white wine
½ cup white wine vinegar
2 shallots, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons lemon juice, plus extra wedges to serve
1 ¾ cup chilled unsalted butter, cubed (just under 4 sticks)
salt and white pepper, to taste

* Click here to learn about cleaning kale.

Directions:

For the beurre blanc, bring wine and vinegar to the boil in a saucepan. Add the shallots, and season with salt and white pepper and season. Reduce heat to low and cook for 6-8 minutes until most of the liquid has evaporated (about 3 tablespoons liquid should remain). Stir in 1 tablespoon of lemon juice. Strain and return to a clean saucepan over medium heat for 30 seconds to warm. Reduce heat to low. Add butter, a piece at a time, whisking constantly so it melts before more is added. Remove from heat and whisk in remaining tablespoon of lemon juice. Season to taste, set aside and keep warm.

Meanwhile, blanch kale in a pan of salted boiling water for 5 minutes or until just tender. Drain. Heat butter and extra virgin olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. Add garlic and chili, then cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until fragrant. Add kale, season and toss to coat. Cook for a further 10 minutes until tender.

To prepare the fillets, in a small bowl mix together the flour, salt and pepper. Heat the olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. Coat the fillets with the seasoned flour, and shake each fillet to remove any extra coating. Cook the fish in the hot oil for 2-3 minutes each side until golden.

To serve, divide the kale and fish among plates, and spoon the beurre blanc over the fish and serve with lemon wedges.

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Sauce 2 – Béchamel Sauce

bechamel-sauceThis is a basic béchamel sauce recipe that is used for dishes like moussaka or the base for an Alfredo. This recipe will make about 2 cups.

Ingredients:

2 ½ cups whole milk
2 tablespoons clarified butter or ¼ stick unsalted butter
⅓ cup all-purpose flour
¼ onion, peeled
1 whole clove
kosher salt, to taste
ground white pepper, to taste
pinch of ground nutmeg (optional)

Directions:

In a heavy-bottomed saucepan, bring the milk to a simmer over a medium heat, stirring occasionally and taking care not to let it boil. Meanwhile, in a separate heavy-bottomed saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat until it’s liquefied. Don’t let it turn brown, though — that will affect the flavor. With a wooden spoon, stir the flour into the melted butter a little bit at a time, until it is fully incorporated into the butter, giving you a pale-yellow-coloured paste. This paste is called a roux. Heat the roux for another minute or so to cook off the taste of raw flour.

Using a wire whisk, slowly add the hot milk to the roux, whisking vigorously to make sure it’s free of lumps. Now stick the pointy end of the clove into the onion and drop them into the sauce. Simmer for about 20 minutes or until the total volume has reduced by about 20 percent, stirring frequently to make sure the sauce doesn’t scorch at the bottom of the pan. The resulting sauce should be smooth and velvety. If it’s too thick, whisk in a bit more milk until it’s just thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.

Remove the sauce from the heat. You can retrieve the clove-stuck onion and discard it now. For an extra smooth consistency, carefully pour the sauce through a wire mesh strainer lined with a piece of cheesecloth. Season the sauce very lightly with salt and white pepper. Be particularly careful with the white pepper — and the nutmeg, if you’re using it. A little bit goes a long way! Keep the béchamel covered until you’re ready to use it.

Mornay SauceMornay Sauce Recipe

The Mornay Sauce is a classic cheese sauce made by enriching a standard Béchamel sauce with Gruyère and Parmesan cheese. The Mornay Sauce is an ideal accompaniment for eggs, vegetables, pasta or fish. This recipe will make about 2 cups of sauce.

Ingredients:

1 pint Béchamel sauce
½ cup Gruyère cheese, grated
½ cup Parmesan cheese, grated
1 tablespoon butter
¼ cup whole milk, hot

Directions:

In a heavy-bottomed saucepan, heat the Béchamel to a simmer. Add the Gruyère and Parmesan cheeses and stir until the cheese has melted. Remove from heat, stir in the butter and adjust consistency with the hot milk if necessary. Serve right away.

cheddar cheese sauceCheddar Cheese Sauce Recipe

The cheddar cheese sauce is a classic cheese sauce for vegetables made by enriching a standard Béchamel sauce with cheddar cheese, mustard and Worcestershire sauce. It’s an ideal accompaniment for vegetables, pasta or fish. Oh, and did I mention nachos? Or macaroni? I mean, honestly, it’s a cheddar cheese sauce. Is there anything you can’t serve it with? This recipe will make about 2 cups of sauce.

Ingredients:

1 pint Béchamel sauce
½ cup cheddar cheese, grated
¼ teaspoon mustard powder
1 ½ teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
¼ cup whole milk, hot

Directions:

In a heavy-bottomed saucepan, heat the Béchamel to a simmer. Add the cheddar cheese and mustard powder and stir until the cheese has melted. Stir in the Worcestershire sauce. Remove from heat and adjust consistency with the hot milk if necessary. Serve right away.

Soubise SauceSoubise Sauce Recipe

The Soubise Sauce is a classic cream sauce for vegetables made by sautéing onions and then puréeing them before adding to a basic Béchamel sauce. The Soubise Sauce is an excellent accompaniment for vegetables, eggs or chicken. Note: For a simple variation on the classic soubise sauce, add some tomato purée to the sauce just before serving. This recipe will make about 1 quart of sauce.

Ingredients:

1 lb onions, chopped
4 tablespoons butter
1 quart Béchamel sauce
2 cups tomato purée (optional)

Directions:

In a heavy-bottomed saucepan, melt the butter and cook the onions until soft and translucent, but don’t let them turn brown. Transfer cooked onions to a food processor. Purée briefly and then return them to the pot. Whisk the Béchamel into the puréed onions and bring the sauce to a simmer. Add optional tomato purée and serve right away.

New England Fish Chowder

Fish Chowder

This is a rendition of Leah Adler’s delicious fish chowder served at The Milky Way. The key is use lots and lots of white pepper.

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups onions, diced
½ cup celery, diced
1 cup corn, canned or frozen
4 tablespoons butter
4 cups potatoes, diced
Salt and white pepper, to taste
4 cups boiling water or vegetable stock
2 pounds fresh halibut, or other firm fish, cut into large chunks
4 cups whole milk
1 ½ tablespoons cornstarch

Directions:

Sauté onions and celery in butter until soft, but not brown. Add potatoes, corn, seasonings and water/broth, simmering until the potatoes are tender. Add the fish to the soup. Cook another 5 – 10 minutes. Do not stir (you’ll break up the fish). Add the milk and bring back up to temperature. Do not boil. If the consistency of the soup is too thin for your liking, you can add the cornstarch, to thicken it. First temper the starch in a small bowl with some of the hot liquid from the soup. Stir until the starch has dissolved and then add this to the main soup pot. This will thicken the broth. Serve this with some crusty buttered bread and it’s a meal in itself. Makes 8 to 12 servings.